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November 2016

Social Media and Your Psychological Profile

twitter_psychology

According to self-proclaimed social media scientist, Dan Zarrella, people post more about sex than any other topic on social networking sites. He’s even created a website, TweetPsych that will scan your tweets and create a psychological profile based on the topics you tweet about. Topics include sex, learning, money, leisure, numbers, cognitive, past, positive, negative, social, thinking, emotions, time, media, anxiety, conceptual, present, primordial, constructive, future, senses, and self-reference. A chart is created and your results are compared to the other 12,000 psychological profiles that have been created, coming up with a percentage of how much more or less you discuss a topic in your tweets than others.

I decided to analyze my Twitter and it turns out that I tweet about sex 516% more than the average user! It says that I may have a preoccupation with sex, but in my defense, I am a relationship examiner. Sex is part of relationships, therefore, I MUST write about it. I found that I tweet about learning 150% more and I post positive tweets 59% more than others. For those who say I’m a pessimist, take that! On the opposite end, I post negative tweets 62% less than others, reference myself 67% less, and post about my past 68% less.

On a completely different note, Sarah Williams of Sarah Williams Real Estate – Austin Tx said that after she got a sale using Instagram she was immediately hooked on the concept of always being on her phone and posting. “It got to the point where I got extreme anxiety when I wasn’t on my phone.  Even when I was in the gym I seemed to be obsessing over my Twitter and Instagram accounts more than paying attention to the workout!”

This could theoretically be used as a dating tool for those who have a Twitter. Say you meet a guy online and you’re planning to go out with him and want a quick snapshot of what he feels important enough to tweet. Get his Twitter name and search him at TweetPsych to get a psychological profile. You may get clued in to the way his mind works, but be careful; you may not like what you find.